Member Spotlight Concentra

IAIABC: Please provide an organizational profile (number of employees, years in business, where you do business, organizational vision)

Greg Gilbert, Senior Vice President and Chief Reimbursement and Governmental Relations Officer, Concentra: Concentra® is a national occupational health provider headquartered in Addison, Texas. Founded in 1979 in Amarillo, Texas, we provide occupational medicine and urgent care, as well as diagnostic, physical rehabilitation, preventive, and corporate wellness services. Concentra’s mission is to improve the health of America’s workforce, one patient at a time. 

Today, Concentra operates more than 520 medical centers and 140 onsite clinics across 44 states. Concentra has more than 11,000 employees and works with more than 185,000 employers nationwide. We strive to treat every person “the Concentra way” by delivering quality clinical care and a positive customer experience from welcoming, respectful, and skillful colleagues. 

 

Concentra Employees

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?We are delivering superior medical outcomes and helping injured employees achieve rapid, sustainable return to work.

GG: Concentra is the largest occupational health provider in the United States, treating one in every five workers’ compensation injury cases nationwide. Our clinicians provide work injury case coordination, consultation, physical therapy, and specialty care for complex cases.

As the nation’s leading provider of work injury care, we are dedicated to delivering superior medical outcomes and helping injured employees achieve rapid, sustainable return to work. We also help employers and employees prevent future injuries with a variety of injury prevention and employee health protection services such as safety assessments, ergonomics, and physical exams. 

Concentra was founded in 1979

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?When costs rise, sometimes people focus on immediate and short-term solutions, but that’s not always the right approach.

GG: Rising health care costs is one of the most significant challenges the industry faces today. As workers’ compensation regulations continue to evolve – and associated costs continue to rise – it’s critical that all stakeholders remain abreast of these changes. When costs rise, sometimes people focus on immediate and short-term solutions, but that’s not always the right approach. Ensuring well-developed policy that is effective - but not overly burdensome - should be a key focus for all stakeholders. For the best outcomes, regulators need to look at the big picture, and not lose sight of employee recovery and how to prevent injuries in the future. Together, we should focus on delivering adequate benefits in the most cost-efficient way, while assuring access to the highest quality medical care available. 

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that you are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

GG: Concentra has the distinction of being the first occupational health provider with a telemedicine solution designed exclusively for work injuries. Concentra Telemed™ is our proprietary telemedicine platform that streamlines work injury care by delivering medical care and rehab services when and where needed. Concentra Telemed uses video technology to give employees access to a nationwide network of occupational health clinicians. Whether it’s the initial consultation following a work incident, a follow-up appointment, or a rehab session from home or work, Concentra Telemed keeps injured employees engaged in their recovery by removing barriers (e.g., transportation, distance, time) that could otherwise hinder them from seeking the care they need. In light of rapidly evolving technology and increased consumer expectations, Concentra is enhancing our technology capabilities, company culture, and communication processes to deliver the best possible experience for our customers and patients. 

Concentra Clinic

IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

GG: IAIABC embodies what Concentra stands for from an occupational injury management perspective. As part of our company values, we have a tireless resolve to facilitate the workplace injury care process for employers and injured workers. Our goal is to make the process less burdensome and costly while still providing excellent patient care. We believe IAIABC and its devoted members share this value and goal. This association provides a forum where industry thought leaders can share knowledge, developments and new ideas, and gain greater insight from colleagues who also have a vested interest in staying current on the latest workers’ compensation developments. 

IAIABC: Please provide an organizational profile (number of employees, years in business, where you do business, organizational vision)

Lou Savage, Administrator, Oregon Workers' Compensation Division: The Oregon Workers’ Compensation Division administers, regulates, and enforces the laws and administrative rules governing the Oregon workers' compensation system. Oregon was one of the earliest states to create a workers’ compensation system over 100 years ago in 1913. Today the division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. The division currently has 180 employees. Our mission is to advance a leading workers’ compensation system that represents integrity and fairness for Oregonians. 

Oregon Workers' Compensation Division Staff

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?

LS: We protect injured workers’ benefits and rights while supporting a positive business climate by:

  • Enforcing workers’ compensation insurance coverage laws so that employers maintain coverage for their subject workers.
  • Ensuring that injured workers receive timely and accurate benefits and quality medical care.
  • Facilitating injured workers’ early return to work through incentive programs for employers and workers.
  • Providing consultation, training, and technical assistance to workers, employers, insurers, claims examiners, attorneys, medical providers, and others.

Hosted IAIABC Conventions in 1946, 1965, 1993 and 2017 

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?

LS: A major challenge that the workers’ compensation industry faces is the rise of the gig economy and the ever-changing nature of the workplace. The percentage of workers who are part of the gig economy has grown beyond transportation network companies to include cleaning companies and technical experts. The question of whether these workers are employees or independent contractors and how the workers’ compensation system responds to this new relationship requires thoughtful discussion.Unless a concerted effort is made to capture this knowledge, it will be lost.

Aside from the gig economy, changes in the traditional workplace are also creating challenges. Flexible schedules, teleworking, and home-based employment were unheard of when the workers’ compensation system was created. However, today the system needs to respond and adapt.

Another major challenge is the loss of institutional knowledge in the workers’ compensation community. There are large numbers of experienced workers’ compensation professionals who are reaching retirement age. Unless a concerted effort is made to capture this knowledge, it will be lost.

Oregon winning President's Award 2017.

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that you are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

LS: As we look to the future and assess how to deliver our core services, we must be able to meet our customers’ desire for personalized and updated services that are flexible and adaptable to changing needs and requirements. There are opportunities to improve how we deliver and receive information from our partners. However, improvements are constrained by our current tools, technology, and processes. For these reasons, the division wants to make a significant investment in modern technology and transform our business processes so that the division can better serve our customers and the workers’ compensation system as a whole.

The division has submitted a budget request to the Oregon legislature to authorize the use of funds for planning efforts. If approved, these funds will be used to create a permanent modernization program within the division. The program’s intent is to oversee multiple information technology and business re-engineering projects over the next few years. Additionally, the program will be continually assessing business and technology needs of the division and planning new upgrades, releases, and maintenance of our investments. A dedicated planning team will result in a sustainable and successful information technology program for the future. Ultimately, the modernization program is expected to improve data quality and integrity, expand program capacity through process efficiency and automation, improve user experience, and improve program and process documentation.

Oregon Staff at the IAIABC 103rd Convention

IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

The world of work is rapidly changing. Proactively, the IAIABC is at the forefront of leading national conversations on how the workers' compensation community should address these issues.

LS: The IAIABC serves as a focal point for its members to share information and ideas, discuss approaches to common problems, share both successes and lessons learned, and provide support for colleagues. Oregon is actively involved in all IAIABC committees and has greatly benefited from IAIABC’s committee work and resources developed at the IAIABC. Oregon also appreciates the IAIABC’s responsiveness to emerging issues within the workers’ compensation industry, such as the Regulation Committee’s commitment to focus attention on Professional Employer Organizations and the creation of a Modernization Task Force. The world of work is rapidly changing. Proactively, the IAIABC is at the forefront of leading national conversations on how the workers’ compensation community should address these changes.

 

SFM December 2018

IAIABC: Please provide an organizational profile (number of employees, years in business, where you do business, organizational vision)

Scott Brener, Senior Vice President and General Council, SFM: Established in 1983, SFM has served as the dominant writer of workers' compensation within Minnesota for over 25 years. Headquartered in Bloomington, Minnesota, we serve employers of all sizes and types based in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota.  We also provide coverage to employers with out-of-state operations in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma and Tennessee amounting to over 20,000 policyholders.  Our mission is to be the workers' compensation partner of choice for agents, employers, and injured workers through unrivaled service, expertise and commitment to workplace safety.

SFM Staff

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?Scott Brener

SB: As one of the few true mono-line workers’ compensation insurers within our community, SFM is better suited to work the nuances and distinguishing characteristics of our complex market. We offer dedicated locally based claims professionals which average 15 years of industry experience; experienced injury prevention experts who understand unique safety hazards associated with the industry; in-house nurses and occupational therapists who help injured workers return to work and assist in long term treatment plans; on-site physicians who advise claims reps on complex medical issues and review diagnoses and treatment plans; in-house bill review professionals who help reduce costs on medical bills; on-site attorneys who represent SFM policyholders in litigation and help claim reps on difficult cases; subrogation specialists who recover money when injuries involve third parties; and fraud investigators who evaluate and pursue claims with red flags.

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?Our industry must find products which will allow for the protection of risk within this new universe.

SB: The industry faces numerous challenges as it moves into its second centennial.  One primary area of concern relates to the utilization and price of medical treatment.  Medical expense comprises approximately 70% of the benefit spend within our system and is often used as a provider profit center to offset medical spend within the Medicare and Medicaid space. Such practice often results in inflated pricing, needless medical procedure and over prescribing of pharmaceuticals including opioids. The IAIABC has been a thought leader with respect to the development of fair and reasonable fee schedules and treatment guidelines. I hope that the organization continues to lead within the context of this debate. 

Secondly, workplaces and employees are maturing and are approaching employment practices in new and unique ways. In some ways, work habits are becoming more transit and illusionary which is redefining the traditional employer/employee relationship. Our industry must find products which will allow for the protection of risk within this new universe.

Thirdly, our industry is being confronted with technology opportunity at an ever-increased pace. Consumers want coverage quicker, easier and more defined in scope than ever before.  Such market pressure will ultimately redefine the underwriting practices and marketing angles of the industry. Market changes generally result in the need for regulatory change. In this capacity the IAIABC could help lead in needed regulatory evolution by promoting and educating appropriate governmental leaders on the changing landscape of the workers’ compensation market.

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that you are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

SB: SFM has always been focused on giving back. Because we were initially born through the action of the Minnesota state legislature, we continue to be a valuable source of strength to our affected state political systems. SFM continually assists to the needs of our regulatory friends by providing reliable data resources, industry expertise and management support to affected programs within state government.

Another unique way we give back is through the SFM Foundation, a nonprofit we created to ease the burdens on families affected by workplace accidents. To do this, the Foundation provides post-secondary education scholarships to children of parents fatally or seriously injured while working for any Minnesota or Iowa employer. Since 2008, approximately $1.7 million has been committed to support 151 scholarships which has been conducted 100% through the voluntary actions of our employees.

Beyond the scope of charitable giving, SFM has entered into the world of insurance technology. Throughout the last year many of us have served as mentors to a variety of start-ups which are seeking to improve the business practices and outcomes of our market. In this capacity, we have also assisted in the angel financing of many such enterprises.

SFM Insurance Award

IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

It serves as the only point of conversation that focuses exclusively on the needs of the workers' compensation community.

SB: From my perspective, the IAIABC serves as the public policy leader within the field of workers’ compensation. Comprised of the vast majority of US state jurisdictions, Canadian provinces and additional sovereign nations, the IAIABC can realistically help develop, message and market trends and solutions facing our industry. It serves as the only point of conversation that focuses exclusively on the needs of the workers’ compensation community through white paper drafting, EDI standard development, model rule creation, etc.

As an Associate Member, I believe I assist in bringing ideas, trends and market realization to those who ultimately take responsibility for painting the very regulatory landscape which we all participate within. I would strongly encourage any entity and/or constituency engaged in the activities of workers’ compensation to come take a peek at what the IAIABC is up to. If they are wise, they will find themselves enlisting for the long haul!

Montana Department of Labor and Industry Employment Relations Division November 2018

IAIABC: Please provide an organizational profile (number of employees, years in business, where you do business, organizational vision)

Bill Wheeler, Workers' Comp Claims Assistance Bureau Chief, Montana Department of Labor Employment Relations Division: Our mission is to promote and protect the well-being of Montana workers, employers, and citizens, and to uphold their rights and responsibilities.  In the workers’ comp arena that simply translates to our team being problem solvers who are always looking for opportunities to improve relationships and the system.  We believe in continuous improvement, customer service, accountability, transparency, and collaboration.

Eric Strauss, Bri Lake, and Bill Wheeler

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?

We don’t want to have injuries, but when they do happen, we want to ensure that services are in place to get the injured worker back to work as soon as possible.

BW: Our most vital role is that of ‘solution experts’, working with injured workers and insurers forming a bridge to bring them together and resolve differences as quickly as possible.  In some situations, we use our expertise to provide recommendations or guidance and in other cases we enforce decisions made by our team to uphold a parties’ rights.  Part of the public policy statement on work comp in Montana states “a worker’s removal from the workforce because of a work-related injury or disease has a negative impact on the injured worker, the worker’s family, the employer and the public.” It goes on to say it is an objective to “return a worker to work as soon as possible.”  This has become our mantra.  We don’t want to have injuries, but when they do happen, we want to ensure that services are in place to get the injured worker back to work as soon as possible.

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?We need to collaborate to find and incorporate the latest ideas and solutions and continuously advocate for that purpose.

BW: There are many, including challenges to the constitutionality of workers’ comp, higher medical costs and high premiums for employers, provider access, and the negative impact of the opioid epidemic.   We as a community need to remember our purpose.  Which, in my opinion is to administer a system that helps injured workers return to better health, or as some would say…return to function, so they can get back to work.  We need to collaborate to find and incorporate latest ideas and solutions and continuously advocate for that purpose.  Internally, the biggest challenges are the ‘knowledge purge’ and doing more with less.  With the retirement of baby boomers and the loss of that institutional knowledge, creative efforts are essential to attract millennials to our industry and then we need provide them with the tools and encouragement necessary to be successful.  The Foundations training and NextGen awards through the IAIABC are key tools to train and show appreciation to the future of work comp.

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that you are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

Peter Van Nice, Montana

BW: We are very pleased with the work completed thus far on the development of a drug formulary here in Montana.  The project really began after the 2015 Legislative Session and will hit another milestone with rules being finalized by January 1st.  It has been a very deliberate and thoughtful process with significant stakeholder input. Our outreach piece will be ongoing for at least the next 15 months.  We also have ramped up our research capabilities and will soon complete an injured worker survey which will hopefully provide some perspective on what is working well and what areas need improvement here in Montana. We are also just completing the 10th year of Montana’s Labor Management Advisory Council (LMAC). LMAC has been a productive stage for dialogue among leadership in finding ways to best serve workers and employers in workers’ compensation and safety.  Their leadership and our serving that organization has played a critical role in the positive changes that have occurred.  More to come on these initiatives. 

IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

Jerry Keck, Montana

BW: From our perspective it is very beneficial to participate in requirements gathering and decision making across all jurisdictions to ensure everybody has a seat at the table.  This is a huge benefit when creating and implementing new EDI standards and best practices in other areas.  The many learning and collaborative opportunities available to us through IAIABC have been key in our ability to improve our knowledge base and offer improvements at home.  It led to sweeping changes in the system here in 2011 and continues to allow us to keep our key stakeholders abreast of new initiatives or signs of change in work comp.

 

 

 

myMatrixx, an Express Scripts Company October 2018

Founded in 2001, myMatrixx, an Express Scripts company, began as a pharmacy benefit manager in Tampa, FL with AmeriSys as our first and longest standing client. Today, we are proud to state that our portfolio of clients affords us the opportunity to process thousands of prescriptions on a daily basis, serving patients across the entire United States. We don’t take a day off to serve our clients and patients because our Customer Service Center is open 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.

 myMatrixx, an Express Scripts Company was founded in 2001 

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?This area of expertise has led to the development of solutions that focus on patient care

Kim Ehrlich, Director of Workers' Compensation Regulatory Compliance, myMatrixx, an Express Scripts Company: myMatrixx, an Express Scripts company, provides pharmacy benefit management (PBM) services to meet the specialized needs of workers’ compensation clients and injured workers. This area of expertise has led to the development of solutions that focus on patient care while simplifying claims management, including evidence-based clinical programs, automated medication authorizations, a user-friendly portal, actionable analytics and industry-leading service.

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?we have seen 15 states to-date that have implemented formularies and/or pain guidelines specifically aimed at curbing the prescription of these medications.

KE: The opioid crisis generates a growing awareness that corrective action is imperative for all engaged in the pharmacy delivery system. There has been more communication and collaboration between prescribers, providers and payers over the past few years. Payers are implementing evidence-based programs as they look to prevent abuse, misuse and fraud. Payers are also implementing many utilization management programs around quantity limits, coverage duration and prior authorizations (PAs). On the regulatory front, we have seen 15 states to-date that have implemented formularies and/or pain guidelines specifically aimed at curbing the prescription of these medications. 

enables the participants to identify and determine opportunities to improve administration

IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

KE: IAIABC provides an environment for stakeholders to share their information and perspectives. This is an environment, which enables the participants to identify and determine opportunities to improve administration within the workers’ compensation system.

 

 

 

 

Virginia Workers' Compensation Commission September 2018

The Virginia Workers' Compensation Commission (VWC) has 13 departments under two major divisions, Administration and Judicial. VWC is led by three Commissioners: Commissioner R. Ferrell Newman, Chairman, Commissioner Robert A. Rapaport and Commissioner Wesley G. Marshall. Chief Deputy Commissioner James Szablewicz provides senior leadership for the Judicial Division, Evelyn V. McGill is the Executive Director responsible for the Administrative Division and day-to-day operations of the VWC. The organization has been operating since 1919 and is currently in the onset of its Centennial. 

VWC Headquarters Staff Photo

 Hosted IAIABC Conventions in 1931, 1940 & 2018 

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?The VWC's vision is to: Lead the nation as the most effective and innovative state agency.

Evelyn V. McGill, Executive Director, Virginia Workers' Compensation Commission: The Virginia Workers' Compensation's vision is to: Lead the nation as the most effective and innovative state agency. VWC serves the workers' compensation industry as the State of Virginia's regulator of the Virginia Workers' Compensation Act. Our mission is to: Serve injured workers, victims of crimes, employers, and related industries by providing exceptional services, resolving disputes, and faithfully executing the duties entrusted to us by the Commonwealth of Virginia.

 

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?

Virginia Workers' Compensation Commission accepting the 2016 IAIABC Innovation Award.

EM: Various challenges exist for VWC to meet its vision and mission, as the state’s regulatory agency for workers’ compensation. Serving our various stakeholders requires continuous process improvements, state of the art systems and services, understanding and responding to their needs, and ensuring that our employees are provided tools, resources, support and direction to succeed.  

In 2018, VWC is:

  • Recognizing the start of its Centennial/100th Anniversary
  • Increasing stakeholder engagement
  • Performing facility, system, and service enhancements
  • Implementing and evaluating Virginia's medical fee schedules
  • Reviewing an enhancing compliance initiatives
  • Conducting process efficiency studies to improve overall service delivery
  • Finding E-billing regulatory requirements

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that your are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

Our redesign efforts of all our facilities with state of the arts technology, systems and enhanced security ensure that VWC’s current environment responds to the needs of our stakeholders and our most important resource, our employees.

EM: We are extremely excited to have assisted a panel of stakeholders in the development of Virginia’s first medical fee schedule, as a result of statutory mandates from our legislature. Our fee schedule is quite unique and it has been rewarding to hear from individual regulators around the United States on their interests in the schedule and various new services, including enhanced compliance initiatives in insurance and electronic data interchange and our mediation program.

E-Billing requirements are also being planned and will go live early next year as a result of statutory mandates. Working with other regulators around the country on their e-billing rules and requirements, as well as the IAIABC’s Medical Issues Committee made, this process much easier to design and develop. Automated systems are always quite challenging to research, plan and execute a go-live; the IAIABC and its members continue to assist us in these endeavors.

Our redesign efforts of all our facilities with state of the art technology, systems and enhanced security ensure that VWC’s current environment responds to the needs of our stakeholders and our most important resource, our employees. Team VWC makes our organization operate in an effective manner and our goal is to provide a safe and comfortable work environment.

 

The IAIABC has assisted VWC in making its vision and mission a reality and it has provided resources to VWC to assist in the design of various complex initiatives.IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

EM: It has been very rewarding to have various members of our team present at national meetings and to hold various offices in organizations such as the IAIABC. Our vision to lead the nation is possible because of our strong team. #WeWorkAsOne is our mantra and it exudes the importance of working together and success without individual credit.

The IAIABC has assisted VWC in making its vision and mission a reality and it has provided resources to VWC to assist in the design of various complex initiatives like the fee schedule, e-billing, automated systems, reporting, mediation, compliance and various services. VWC values its strong relationship with the IAIABC, as it has opened doors to communicating with regulators around the country and world. It has helped us share our successful programs, systems, and services with other jurisdictions along with providing the opportunity for VWC to reach out to other states on their programs to assist us with the design of new, innovative services. The IAIABC also offers recognition awards to members for their leadership, outstanding work in being innovative, and actively participating to improve workers' compensation. Over the years, VWC Team Members have been awarded the 2018 NextGen Award, 2017 Frances Perkins Award, and the 2016 Innovation Award.

WorkComp Strategies August 2018

The core mission of WorkComp Strategies is to provide independent analysis and guidance to public sector clients seeking to undertake strategic projects and initiatives. Sample projects include technology modernization and related initiatives; program analysis and improvement; and overall system reform analysis and recommendations.
WorkComp Strategies was founded in 2010

Matt Bryant and Greg Krohm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IAIABC: How does your organization serve the workers’ compensation industry or what do you see as the most important role you play in the workers’ compensation industry?

Matt Bryant, President, WorkComp Strategies: One of the more important roles we play is providing expertise to support effective decision-making. “What have other jurisdictions done in this area, and was it effective? Why? Did the stakeholders support the direction taken?” We help jurisdiction leaders and administrators build on proven ideas and avoid costly mistakes.

IAIABC: What do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?

Workers' compensation systems have to find ways of understanding value beyond cost.

MB: A significant focus in the performance of workers' compensation systems has been placed on cost.In almost any other scenario where cost is a major factor, then necessarily value is called into question. But workers’ compensation systems don’t have a very standardized method of understanding value, which leaves cost as the predominant benchmark, and almost a substitute for value. Workers’ compensation systems have to find ways of understanding value beyond cost. We have been working with the IAIABC on a project in which the results of dispute system services can be compared across jurisdictions. The goal of this effort is to establish benchmarks and practices that drive innovation and improvement, or in other words, value.

IAIABC: Are there any projects/programs/initiatives going on at your organization that your are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

Ryan Guppy, Vickie Kennedy, and Matt Bryant

MB: Many US and Canada jurisdictions are in the early phases of modernizing their systems and processes. We have ongoing projects with several such jurisdictions, and it is exciting to work towards improvement and innovation on these projects. Some of the key objectives include both efficiency and effectiveness. In other words, these projects involve modernizing not only to increase efficiency, but also to make the agency more effective at providing services. Re-orienting government services toward a direction of improving service levels requires asking questions like, “Who are our customers? What do they need? How can we best support that?” Finding answers to questions like these and taking steps to act on them puts a refreshing perspective on government services.

 

The IAIABC is committed to innovation and improvement, and not status quo. This is the sort of association that matches our values.IAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? What would you tell others about the benefits of membership?

MB: We value the opportunity to engage in policy discussions with workers’ compensation leaders across the US and internationally. Committees and working groups provide a ready network of team members to dig into the key issues facing workers’ compensation today. The IAIABC is committed to innovation and improvement, and not status quo. This is the sort of association that matches our values.

 

 

 

Michigan Workers Compensation Agency July 2018

Michigan is one of the 15 founding members of the IAIABC and site of the first ever IAIABC Convention in 1914. We thought it natural for the Michigan Workers' Compensation Agency to be our first "Member Spotlight."

We need to think differently and approach statutory construction and regulations with flexibility

IAIABCWhat do you see as some of the major challenges the industry is facing, and how can we as a community address them?

Mark Long, Director, Michigan Workers' Compensation AgencyThe speed at which industries are moving makes it difficult to establish an appropriate level of regulation. As the new economy grows it is impacting everything from how we travel to how we work to how we see the doctor. We must learn from each other, which includes our international jurisdictions.

Mark LongHosted IAIABC Conventions 1914,1951,1981,2002
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

IAIABC: Are there any projects going on at your organization that you are particularly excited or enthusiastic about?

Kathy Rademacher and Lori Raby
ML: We are in the midst of an IT system overhaul. We have already replaced two legacy systems and are presently working on our primary system. The replacement project will provide us the opportunity to overhaul our rules for processing data and will move us a long way towards eliminating paper. We are also in the process of establishing billing and reimbursement guidelines for telehealth.

4 IAIABC Presidents have been from MichiganIAIABC: Why is your organization a member of the IAIABC? The IAIABC is an opportunity to collaborate nationally and internationally with industry leaders.

ML: It provides occasion to gain an immense amount of feedback from a very dedicated group of professionals. The committee work is always top-notch and the white papers are thoroughly developed.